Technology-supported rehabilitation therapy for neurological patients has gained increasing interest since the last decades. The literature agrees that the goal of robots should be to induce motor plasticity in subjects undergoing rehabilitation treatment by providing the patients with repetitive, intensive, and task-oriented treatment. As a key element, robot controllers should adapt to patients’ status and recovery stage. Thus, the design of effective training modalities and their hardware implementation play a crucial role in robot-assisted rehabilitation and strongly influence the treatment outcome. The objective of this paper is to provide a multi-disciplinary vision of patient-cooperative control strategies for upper-limb rehabilitation exoskeletons to help researchers bridge the gap between human motor control aspects, desired rehabilitation training modalities, and their hardware implementations. To this aim, we propose a three-level classification based on 1) “high-level” training modalities, 2) “low-level” control strategies, and 3) “hardware-level” implementation. Then, we provide examples of literature upper-limb exoskeletons to show how the three levels of implementation have been combined to obtain a given high-level behavior, which is specifically designed to promote motor relearning during the rehabilitation treatment. Finally, we emphasize the need for the development of compliant control strategies, based on the collaboration between the exoskeleton and the wearer, we report the key findings to promote the desired physical human-robot interaction for neurorehabilitation, and we provide insights and suggestions for future works.

Review on Patient-Cooperative Control Strategies for Upper-Limb Rehabilitation Exoskeletons

Dalla Gasperina S.;Pedrocchi A.;Braghin F.;Gandolla M.
2021

Abstract

Technology-supported rehabilitation therapy for neurological patients has gained increasing interest since the last decades. The literature agrees that the goal of robots should be to induce motor plasticity in subjects undergoing rehabilitation treatment by providing the patients with repetitive, intensive, and task-oriented treatment. As a key element, robot controllers should adapt to patients’ status and recovery stage. Thus, the design of effective training modalities and their hardware implementation play a crucial role in robot-assisted rehabilitation and strongly influence the treatment outcome. The objective of this paper is to provide a multi-disciplinary vision of patient-cooperative control strategies for upper-limb rehabilitation exoskeletons to help researchers bridge the gap between human motor control aspects, desired rehabilitation training modalities, and their hardware implementations. To this aim, we propose a three-level classification based on 1) “high-level” training modalities, 2) “low-level” control strategies, and 3) “hardware-level” implementation. Then, we provide examples of literature upper-limb exoskeletons to show how the three levels of implementation have been combined to obtain a given high-level behavior, which is specifically designed to promote motor relearning during the rehabilitation treatment. Finally, we emphasize the need for the development of compliant control strategies, based on the collaboration between the exoskeleton and the wearer, we report the key findings to promote the desired physical human-robot interaction for neurorehabilitation, and we provide insights and suggestions for future works.
motor recovery
neurorehabilitation
physical human-robot interaction
rehabilitation robotics
robot control
upper-limb exoskeletons
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11311/1203294
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