The ever increasing number of processing units integrated on the same many-core chip delivers computational power that can exceed the performance requirements of a single application. The number of chips (and related power consumption) can thus be reduced to serve multiple applications — a practice which is called resource consolidation. However, this solution requires techniques to partition and assign resources among the applications and to manage unpredictable dynamic workloads. To provide the performance requirements in such scenarios, we exploit application auto-tuning, based on design-time analysis, of both application-specific dynamic knobs and computational parallelism. Such features are implemented in a software library, which is used to demonstrate the main contribution of this paper: a light-weight Run-Time Resource Management — RTRM — technique to improve resource sharing for computationally intensive OpenCL applications. We evaluate how much the interaction between RTRM and application auto-tuning can become synergistic yet orthogonal. In the proposed approach, run-time adaptation decisions are taken by each application, autonomously. This has two main advantages: i) a non-invasive application design, in terms of source code, and ii) a very low run-time overhead, since it does not require any central coordination of a supervisor nor communication between the applications. We carried out an experimental campaign by using a video processing application — an OpenCL stereo-matching implemen- tation — and stressing out resource usage. We proved that, while RTRM is necessary to provide lower variance of the application performance, the application auto-tuning layer is fundamental to trade it off with respect to the computation accuracy.

Evaluating orthogonality between application auto-tuning and run-time resource management for adaptive OpenCL applications

PAONE, EDOARDO;GADIOLI, DAVIDE;PALERMO, GIANLUCA;ZACCARIA, VITTORIO;SILVANO, CRISTINA
2014

Abstract

The ever increasing number of processing units integrated on the same many-core chip delivers computational power that can exceed the performance requirements of a single application. The number of chips (and related power consumption) can thus be reduced to serve multiple applications — a practice which is called resource consolidation. However, this solution requires techniques to partition and assign resources among the applications and to manage unpredictable dynamic workloads. To provide the performance requirements in such scenarios, we exploit application auto-tuning, based on design-time analysis, of both application-specific dynamic knobs and computational parallelism. Such features are implemented in a software library, which is used to demonstrate the main contribution of this paper: a light-weight Run-Time Resource Management — RTRM — technique to improve resource sharing for computationally intensive OpenCL applications. We evaluate how much the interaction between RTRM and application auto-tuning can become synergistic yet orthogonal. In the proposed approach, run-time adaptation decisions are taken by each application, autonomously. This has two main advantages: i) a non-invasive application design, in terms of source code, and ii) a very low run-time overhead, since it does not require any central coordination of a supervisor nor communication between the applications. We carried out an experimental campaign by using a video processing application — an OpenCL stereo-matching implemen- tation — and stressing out resource usage. We proved that, while RTRM is necessary to provide lower variance of the application performance, the application auto-tuning layer is fundamental to trade it off with respect to the computation accuracy.
Proceedings of the International Conference on Application-Specific Systems, Architectures and Processors
9781479936090
9781479936090
Hardware and Architecture, OpenCL, Application Autotuning, embedded platforms, run-time resource management
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11311/961334
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