Digital phase-locked loops (DPLLs) based on binary phase detectors (BPDs) avoid power-hungry high-resolution time/digital converters (TDCs) while demonstrating advantages in area, power consumption, and design complexity. The introduction of digital/time converters (DTCs) enables fractional-N resolution at high spectral purity [1]. The design of a bang-bang digital PLL for wireless standards has two main challenges: quantization noise must be kept below the tolerable spot phase noise and fast lock must be guaranteed even for wide frequency steps. However, the overload of the BPD causes bang-bang PLLs to fail lock or to exhibit extremely long transients. A similar issue appears in the design of sub-sampling PLLs. This problem is exacerbated when the bang-bang PLL is designed for low phase noise for the tight resolution required of the digitally controlled oscillator (DCO). Fast locking techniques are usually based on the use of lookup tables [2], finite state machine [3], or gear shifting techniques, mostly in the field of clock-and-data recovery circuits (CDR) where spot noise performance is less of a concern. High-performance bang-bang PLLs (or subsampling PLLs) also include a frequency-aid circuit running in background [4], but its settling performance is seldom discussed.

A low-phase-noise digital bang-bang PLL with fast lock over a wide lock range

Bertulessi, Luca;Grimaldi, Luigi;Cherniak, Dmytro;Samori, Carlo;Levantino, Salvatore
2018

Abstract

Digital phase-locked loops (DPLLs) based on binary phase detectors (BPDs) avoid power-hungry high-resolution time/digital converters (TDCs) while demonstrating advantages in area, power consumption, and design complexity. The introduction of digital/time converters (DTCs) enables fractional-N resolution at high spectral purity [1]. The design of a bang-bang digital PLL for wireless standards has two main challenges: quantization noise must be kept below the tolerable spot phase noise and fast lock must be guaranteed even for wide frequency steps. However, the overload of the BPD causes bang-bang PLLs to fail lock or to exhibit extremely long transients. A similar issue appears in the design of sub-sampling PLLs. This problem is exacerbated when the bang-bang PLL is designed for low phase noise for the tight resolution required of the digitally controlled oscillator (DCO). Fast locking techniques are usually based on the use of lookup tables [2], finite state machine [3], or gear shifting techniques, mostly in the field of clock-and-data recovery circuits (CDR) where spot noise performance is less of a concern. High-performance bang-bang PLLs (or subsampling PLLs) also include a frequency-aid circuit running in background [4], but its settling performance is seldom discussed.
Digest of 2018 IEEE International Solid - State Circuits Conference (ISSCC)
978-1-5090-4940-0
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11311/1049196
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