Two key ingredients of a successful neuro-rehabilitative intervention have been identified as intensive and repetitive training and subject's active participation, which can be coupled in an active robot-assisted training. To exploit these two elements, we recorded electroencephalography, electromyography and kinematics signals from nine healthy subjects performing a 2×2 factorial design protocol, with subject's volitional intention and robotic glove assistance as factors. We quantitatively evaluated primary sensorimotor, premotor and supplementary motor areas activation during movement execution by computing event-related desynchronization (ERD) patterns associated to mu and beta rhythms. ERD patterns showed a similar behavior for all investigated regions: statistically significant ERDs began earlier in conditions requiring subject's volitional contribution; ERDs were prolonged towards the end of movement in conditions in which the robotic assistance was present. Our study suggests that the combination between subject volitional contribution and movement assistance provided by the robotic device (i.e., active robot-assisted modality) is able to provide early brain activation (i.e., earlier ERD) associated with stronger proprioceptive feedback (i.e., longer ERD). This finding might be particularly important for neurological patients, where movement cannot be completed autonomously and passive/active robot-assisted modalities are the only possibilities of execution.

EEG Analysis during Active and Assisted Repetitive Movements: Evidence for Differences in Neural Engagement

Tacchino, Giulia;Gandolla, Marta;Coelli, Stefania;Barbieri, Riccardo;Pedrocchi, Alessandra;Bianchi, Anna M.
2017-01-01

Abstract

Two key ingredients of a successful neuro-rehabilitative intervention have been identified as intensive and repetitive training and subject's active participation, which can be coupled in an active robot-assisted training. To exploit these two elements, we recorded electroencephalography, electromyography and kinematics signals from nine healthy subjects performing a 2×2 factorial design protocol, with subject's volitional intention and robotic glove assistance as factors. We quantitatively evaluated primary sensorimotor, premotor and supplementary motor areas activation during movement execution by computing event-related desynchronization (ERD) patterns associated to mu and beta rhythms. ERD patterns showed a similar behavior for all investigated regions: statistically significant ERDs began earlier in conditions requiring subject's volitional contribution; ERDs were prolonged towards the end of movement in conditions in which the robotic assistance was present. Our study suggests that the combination between subject volitional contribution and movement assistance provided by the robotic device (i.e., active robot-assisted modality) is able to provide early brain activation (i.e., earlier ERD) associated with stronger proprioceptive feedback (i.e., longer ERD). This finding might be particularly important for neurological patients, where movement cannot be completed autonomously and passive/active robot-assisted modalities are the only possibilities of execution.
2017
Assistive devices; electroencephalography (EEG); electromyography (EMG); event-related desynchronization/event-related synchronization (ERD/ERS); neurorehabilitation; Adult; Brain Mapping; Cerebral Cortex; Electroencephalography; Female; Humans; Male; Man-Machine Systems; Movement; Neurological Rehabilitation; Patient Participation; Robotics; Volition; Neuroscience (all); Biomedical Engineering; Computer Science Applications1707 Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11311/1038757
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