Nowadays, the treatment of health care-associated infections represents a serious issue, due to the increasing number of bacterial strains resistant to traditional antibiotics. The use of antiseptics like quaternary ammonium salts and biguanides is a viable alternative to face these life-threatening infections. However, their inherent toxicity as well as the necessity of providing a sustained release to avoid the formation of pathogen biofilms are compelling obstacles towards their assessment in the hospitals. Within this framework, the role of polymeric drug delivery systems is fundamental to overcome the aforementioned problems. Biocompatibility, biodegradability and excipient-drug interactions are crucial properties determining the efficacy of the formulation. In this work, we provide an in-depth analysis of the polymer drug delivery systems that have been developed or are under development for the sustained release of positively charged antiseptics, highlighting the crucial characteristics that allowed to achieve the most relevant therapeutic effects. We reported and compared natural occurring polymers and synthetic carriers to show their pros and cons and applicability in the treatment of health care-associated infections. Then, the discussion is focused on a particularly relevant class of materials adopted for the scope, represented by polyesters, which gave rise, due to their biodegradability, to the field of resorbable drug delivery devices. Finally, a specific analysis on the effect of the polymer functionalization over the formulation performances for the different types of polymeric carriers is presented.

Health care-associated infections: Controlled delivery of cationic antiseptics from polymeric excipients

Maraldi M.;Moretti G.;Sponchioni M.;Moscatelli D.
2021

Abstract

Nowadays, the treatment of health care-associated infections represents a serious issue, due to the increasing number of bacterial strains resistant to traditional antibiotics. The use of antiseptics like quaternary ammonium salts and biguanides is a viable alternative to face these life-threatening infections. However, their inherent toxicity as well as the necessity of providing a sustained release to avoid the formation of pathogen biofilms are compelling obstacles towards their assessment in the hospitals. Within this framework, the role of polymeric drug delivery systems is fundamental to overcome the aforementioned problems. Biocompatibility, biodegradability and excipient-drug interactions are crucial properties determining the efficacy of the formulation. In this work, we provide an in-depth analysis of the polymer drug delivery systems that have been developed or are under development for the sustained release of positively charged antiseptics, highlighting the crucial characteristics that allowed to achieve the most relevant therapeutic effects. We reported and compared natural occurring polymers and synthetic carriers to show their pros and cons and applicability in the treatment of health care-associated infections. Then, the discussion is focused on a particularly relevant class of materials adopted for the scope, represented by polyesters, which gave rise, due to their biodegradability, to the field of resorbable drug delivery devices. Finally, a specific analysis on the effect of the polymer functionalization over the formulation performances for the different types of polymeric carriers is presented.
Cationic antiseptics
Controlled delivery
Health care-associated infections
Polymeric drug delivery systems
Sustained release
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11311/1182300
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