Microbial conversion of oleic acid (1) to form value-added industrial products has gained increasing scientific and economic interest. So far, the production of natural lactones with flavor and fragrance properties from fatty acids by non-genetically modified organisms (non-GMO) involves whole cells of bacteria catalyzing the hydration of unsaturated fatty acids as well as yeast strains responsible for further -oxidation processes. Development of a non-GMO process, involving a sole strain possessing both enzymatic activities, significantly lowers the costs of the process and constitutes a better method from the customers’ point of view regarding biosafety issues. Twenty bacteria from the genus of Bacillus, Comamonas, Dietzia, Gordonia, Micrococcus, Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus and Streptomyces were screened for oxidative functionalization of oleic acid (1). Micrococcus luteus PCM525 was selected as the sole strain catalyzing the one-pot transformation of oleic acid (1) into natural valuable peach and strawberry-flavored -dodecalactone (6) used in the food, beverage, cosmetics and pharmaceutical industries. Based on the identified products formed during the process of biotransformation, we clearly established a pathway showing that oleic acid (1) is hydrated to 10-hydroxystearic acid (2), then oxidized to 10-ketostearic acid (3), giving 4-ketolauric acid (4) after three cycles of -oxidation, which is subsequently reduced and cyclized to -dodecalactone (6) (Scheme 1). Moreover, three other strains (Rhodococcus erythropolis DSM44534, Rhodococcus ruber PCM2166, Dietzia sp. DSM44016), with high concomitant activities of oleate hydratase and alcohol dehydrogenase, were identified as ecient producers of 10-ketostearic acid (3), which can be used in lubricant and detergent formulations. Considering the prevalence of -dodecalactone (6) and 10-ketostearic acid (3) applications and the economic benefits of sustainable management, microbial bioconversion of oleic acid (1) is an undeniably attractive approach.

Bacterial biotransformation of oleic acid: new findings on the formation of γ-dodecalactone and 10-ketostearic acid in the culture of Micrococcus luteus

E. Brenna
2020-01-01

Abstract

Microbial conversion of oleic acid (1) to form value-added industrial products has gained increasing scientific and economic interest. So far, the production of natural lactones with flavor and fragrance properties from fatty acids by non-genetically modified organisms (non-GMO) involves whole cells of bacteria catalyzing the hydration of unsaturated fatty acids as well as yeast strains responsible for further -oxidation processes. Development of a non-GMO process, involving a sole strain possessing both enzymatic activities, significantly lowers the costs of the process and constitutes a better method from the customers’ point of view regarding biosafety issues. Twenty bacteria from the genus of Bacillus, Comamonas, Dietzia, Gordonia, Micrococcus, Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus and Streptomyces were screened for oxidative functionalization of oleic acid (1). Micrococcus luteus PCM525 was selected as the sole strain catalyzing the one-pot transformation of oleic acid (1) into natural valuable peach and strawberry-flavored -dodecalactone (6) used in the food, beverage, cosmetics and pharmaceutical industries. Based on the identified products formed during the process of biotransformation, we clearly established a pathway showing that oleic acid (1) is hydrated to 10-hydroxystearic acid (2), then oxidized to 10-ketostearic acid (3), giving 4-ketolauric acid (4) after three cycles of -oxidation, which is subsequently reduced and cyclized to -dodecalactone (6) (Scheme 1). Moreover, three other strains (Rhodococcus erythropolis DSM44534, Rhodococcus ruber PCM2166, Dietzia sp. DSM44016), with high concomitant activities of oleate hydratase and alcohol dehydrogenase, were identified as ecient producers of 10-ketostearic acid (3), which can be used in lubricant and detergent formulations. Considering the prevalence of -dodecalactone (6) and 10-ketostearic acid (3) applications and the economic benefits of sustainable management, microbial bioconversion of oleic acid (1) is an undeniably attractive approach.
flavors and fragrances; -dodecalactone; 10-ketostearic acid; oleic acid; Micrococcus luteus; biotransformation; whole cell processes; hydration; -oxidation
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11311/1152488
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