Nuclear emulsions are a formidable tool for detecting charged particles with sub-micrometric spatial resolution, a feature which is essential in quantum interferometry experiments with antimatter. In this context, we have tested the sensitivity of such a detector, devoid of the usual protective layer, with very low energy positrons, that is in the range 0.2-17 keV. The results show that emulsions are sensitive to positrons with energy below 1 keV. Their detection efficiency increases as a function of the energy and it tends to saturate over ∼15 keV. This demonstrates the feasibility of using this type of detector in low energy regime and defines the limits of use for future gravitational studies with antimatter.

Sensitivity of emulsion detectors to low energy positrons

Anzi L.;Ferragut R.;Toso V.
2020

Abstract

Nuclear emulsions are a formidable tool for detecting charged particles with sub-micrometric spatial resolution, a feature which is essential in quantum interferometry experiments with antimatter. In this context, we have tested the sensitivity of such a detector, devoid of the usual protective layer, with very low energy positrons, that is in the range 0.2-17 keV. The results show that emulsions are sensitive to positrons with energy below 1 keV. Their detection efficiency increases as a function of the energy and it tends to saturate over ∼15 keV. This demonstrates the feasibility of using this type of detector in low energy regime and defines the limits of use for future gravitational studies with antimatter.
Beam dynamics
Beam-line instrumentation (beam position and profile monitors
beam-intensity monitors
bunch length monitors)
Detector alignment and calibration methods (lasers, sources, particle-beams)
Very low-energy charged particle detectors
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11311/1139153
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