As the most common form of Dementia, Alzheimer’s disease (AD) causes behavioural, cognitive and physical impairments. The cognitive impairments, typical of this condition, lead to errors in one’s memory of places and a reduced ability to spontaneously adapt to new spaces. As sufferers begin to realise these changes, they may feel a sense of shame and inadequacy caused by emotional borderline situations resulting from difficulties in performing normal daily routines. Objectives. The purpose of this study is to analyse how design can promote well-being through the creation of physical environments for people with dementia due to AD that are psychologically supportive in order to manage the major stress accompanying illness. Methods. In collaboration with caregivers and professionals, involved in different workshops and interview sessions, we delineate a set of design guidelines, with essential quality of dignity and perceived well-being, for supportive environments tailored for people with dementia. Results. We designed a set of future care scenarios around the concepts of meaningful activities, memory and stimulation. An environment designed through a system of elements, considered as activators of well-being, able to provide the patients the possibility to regain autonomy, dignity and self-confidence. Conclusions. Findings suggest that there is sufficient evidence to argue that environmental intervention can be able to enhance the perceived well-being of the patients. Therefore, inside the framework of Non-Pharmacological Therapies, design of the physical environment can be recognized as an important aid in the care of people with dementia.

Designing for dementia: Interior Design as a tool to enhance well-being among patients and caregivers

GRAMEGNA, SILVIA MARIA;BIAMONTI, ALESSANDRO
2016

Abstract

As the most common form of Dementia, Alzheimer’s disease (AD) causes behavioural, cognitive and physical impairments. The cognitive impairments, typical of this condition, lead to errors in one’s memory of places and a reduced ability to spontaneously adapt to new spaces. As sufferers begin to realise these changes, they may feel a sense of shame and inadequacy caused by emotional borderline situations resulting from difficulties in performing normal daily routines. Objectives. The purpose of this study is to analyse how design can promote well-being through the creation of physical environments for people with dementia due to AD that are psychologically supportive in order to manage the major stress accompanying illness. Methods. In collaboration with caregivers and professionals, involved in different workshops and interview sessions, we delineate a set of design guidelines, with essential quality of dignity and perceived well-being, for supportive environments tailored for people with dementia. Results. We designed a set of future care scenarios around the concepts of meaningful activities, memory and stimulation. An environment designed through a system of elements, considered as activators of well-being, able to provide the patients the possibility to regain autonomy, dignity and self-confidence. Conclusions. Findings suggest that there is sufficient evidence to argue that environmental intervention can be able to enhance the perceived well-being of the patients. Therefore, inside the framework of Non-Pharmacological Therapies, design of the physical environment can be recognized as an important aid in the care of people with dementia.
Wellbeing 2016. Co-creating pathways to well-being. Book of proceedings.
978-1-904839-87-3
dementia
dementia-friendly environments
design
non-pharmacological therapies
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11311/999554
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