Continued manned presence on space stations or Earth-orbiting pressurized modules requires research on habitability issues for human beings in confined microgravity environments. This research is necessary to support sound industrial design strategies for comfort and functionality and, therefore, increased efficiency and better working conditions in outer space habitation. The task of industrial design is therefore to design instruments, materials, and tools, including clothing, that facilitate human movement and the carrying out of the different activities required of space station inhabitants. In terms of living environments, the aesthetic requirements of the user/astronaut must be met while also ensuring conditions of habitability that are truly stimulating. These should not only reflect a sense of attractiveness but, even more importantly, be able to recreate artificially much of the Earth’s environmental stimuli (light, air, odors), which are not ordinarily present in confined microgravity environments. Such efforts are of course aimed at enhancing the psychological, social, and physiological well-being of the crew. Industrial design needs to consider the factors that are essential to a stimulating, attractive, and efficient environment for human beings in outer space. The demand for this research arose from the conclusions of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) studies on the psychological and physiological needs of the crew associated with an increase in the length of space missions from a few weeks’ duration to six or twelve months, if not longer, on the International Space Station. Prior to the studies, the human factors of the crew were neglected and viewed as secondary in comparison with other priorities; now, however, the conclusions have led to a form of design aimed at increasing the comfort and mental well-being of the individual.

Conditions of Microgravity and Body's "Second Skin"

DOMINONI, ANNALISA
2003

Abstract

Continued manned presence on space stations or Earth-orbiting pressurized modules requires research on habitability issues for human beings in confined microgravity environments. This research is necessary to support sound industrial design strategies for comfort and functionality and, therefore, increased efficiency and better working conditions in outer space habitation. The task of industrial design is therefore to design instruments, materials, and tools, including clothing, that facilitate human movement and the carrying out of the different activities required of space station inhabitants. In terms of living environments, the aesthetic requirements of the user/astronaut must be met while also ensuring conditions of habitability that are truly stimulating. These should not only reflect a sense of attractiveness but, even more importantly, be able to recreate artificially much of the Earth’s environmental stimuli (light, air, odors), which are not ordinarily present in confined microgravity environments. Such efforts are of course aimed at enhancing the psychological, social, and physiological well-being of the crew. Industrial design needs to consider the factors that are essential to a stimulating, attractive, and efficient environment for human beings in outer space. The demand for this research arose from the conclusions of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) studies on the psychological and physiological needs of the crew associated with an increase in the length of space missions from a few weeks’ duration to six or twelve months, if not longer, on the International Space Station. Prior to the studies, the human factors of the crew were neglected and viewed as secondary in comparison with other priorities; now, however, the conclusions have led to a form of design aimed at increasing the comfort and mental well-being of the individual.
Mediating the Human Body. Technology, Communication, and Fashion
9780805844801
design; human factors; international space station; microgravity; space clothing; space design
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11311/270100
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