With a concentration of people, activities, and infrastructures, urban areas are particularly vulnerable to the negative effects of climate change. Among others, the intensification of the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect is leading to an increased impact on citizen health and the urban ecosystem. In this context, this study aims to investigate the effect of urban morphology and land cover composition-which are established by exploiting the Local Climate Zone (LCZ) classification system-on two urban climate indicators, i.e., Land Surface Temperature (LST) and air temperature. The study area is the Metropolitan City of Milan (northern Italy). LCZ and LST maps are derived by leveraging satellite imagery and building height datasets. Both authoritative and crowdsourced in situ measurements are used for the analysis of air temperature. Several experiments are run to investigate the mutual relation between LCZ, LST, and air temperature by measuring LST and air temperature patterns in different LCZs and periods. Besides a strong temporal correlation between LST and air temperature, results point out vegetation and natural areas as major mitigating factors of both variables. On the other hand, higher buildings turn out to increase local air temperature while buffering LST values. A way lower influence of building density is measured, with compact building areas experiencing slightly higher air temperature yet no significant differences in terms of LST. These outcomes provide valuable tools to urban planners and stakeholders for implementing evidence-based UHI mitigation strategies.

Insights into the Effect of Urban Morphology and Land Cover on Land Surface and Air Temperatures in the Metropolitan City of Milan (Italy) Using Satellite Imagery and In Situ Measurements

Vavassori, A;Brovelli, MA
2023-01-01

Abstract

With a concentration of people, activities, and infrastructures, urban areas are particularly vulnerable to the negative effects of climate change. Among others, the intensification of the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect is leading to an increased impact on citizen health and the urban ecosystem. In this context, this study aims to investigate the effect of urban morphology and land cover composition-which are established by exploiting the Local Climate Zone (LCZ) classification system-on two urban climate indicators, i.e., Land Surface Temperature (LST) and air temperature. The study area is the Metropolitan City of Milan (northern Italy). LCZ and LST maps are derived by leveraging satellite imagery and building height datasets. Both authoritative and crowdsourced in situ measurements are used for the analysis of air temperature. Several experiments are run to investigate the mutual relation between LCZ, LST, and air temperature by measuring LST and air temperature patterns in different LCZs and periods. Besides a strong temporal correlation between LST and air temperature, results point out vegetation and natural areas as major mitigating factors of both variables. On the other hand, higher buildings turn out to increase local air temperature while buffering LST values. A way lower influence of building density is measured, with compact building areas experiencing slightly higher air temperature yet no significant differences in terms of LST. These outcomes provide valuable tools to urban planners and stakeholders for implementing evidence-based UHI mitigation strategies.
2023
urban heat island
local climate zones
land surface temperature
air temperature
geographic information systems
satellite imagery
citizen science
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11311/1231438
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