Opportunely arranged microscaled fibers offer an attractive 3D architecture for tissue regeneration as they may enhance and stimulate specific tissue regrowth. Among different scaffolding options, encapsulating cells in degradable hydrogel microfibers appears as particularly attractive strategy. Hydrogel patches, in fact, offer a highly hydrated environment, allow easy incorporation of biologically active molecules, and can easily adapt to implantation site. In addition, microfiber architecture is intrinsically porous and can improve mass transport, vascularization, and cell survival after grafting. Anionic polysaccharides, as pectin or the more popular alginate, represent a particularly promising choice for the fabrication of cell-laden patches, due to their extremely mild gelation in the presence of divalent ions and widely accepted biocompatibility. In this study, to combine the favorable properties of hydrogel and fibrous architecture, a simple coaxial flow wet-spinning system was used to prepare cell-laden, 3D fibrous patches using RGD-modified pectin. Rapid fabrication of coherent self-standing patches, with diameter in the range of 100–200 μm and high cell density, was possible by accurate choice of pectin and calcium ions concentrations. Cells were homogeneously dispersed throughout the microfibers and remained highly viable for up to 2 weeks, when the initial stage of myotubes formation was observed. Modified-pectin microfibers appear as promising scaffold to support muscle tissue regeneration, due to their inherent porosity, the favorable cell–material interaction, and the possibility to guide cell alignment toward a functional tissue.

RGD-pectin microfiber patches for guiding muscle tissue regeneration

Campiglio C. E.;Carcano A.;Draghi L.
2022-01-01

Abstract

Opportunely arranged microscaled fibers offer an attractive 3D architecture for tissue regeneration as they may enhance and stimulate specific tissue regrowth. Among different scaffolding options, encapsulating cells in degradable hydrogel microfibers appears as particularly attractive strategy. Hydrogel patches, in fact, offer a highly hydrated environment, allow easy incorporation of biologically active molecules, and can easily adapt to implantation site. In addition, microfiber architecture is intrinsically porous and can improve mass transport, vascularization, and cell survival after grafting. Anionic polysaccharides, as pectin or the more popular alginate, represent a particularly promising choice for the fabrication of cell-laden patches, due to their extremely mild gelation in the presence of divalent ions and widely accepted biocompatibility. In this study, to combine the favorable properties of hydrogel and fibrous architecture, a simple coaxial flow wet-spinning system was used to prepare cell-laden, 3D fibrous patches using RGD-modified pectin. Rapid fabrication of coherent self-standing patches, with diameter in the range of 100–200 μm and high cell density, was possible by accurate choice of pectin and calcium ions concentrations. Cells were homogeneously dispersed throughout the microfibers and remained highly viable for up to 2 weeks, when the initial stage of myotubes formation was observed. Modified-pectin microfibers appear as promising scaffold to support muscle tissue regeneration, due to their inherent porosity, the favorable cell–material interaction, and the possibility to guide cell alignment toward a functional tissue.
2022
cell encapsulation
cell-matrix interactions
hydrogel microfibers
muscle tissue engineering
pectin hydrogels
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11311/1207583
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