This study is a starting point for the development of an efficient method for rare earths (REs) and transition metals (TMs) recovery from waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) via a hydrometallurgical process. The capture and release capability of mineral clays (STx) and activated carbons (AC), pristine and modified (STx-L6 and AC-L6) with a linear penta-ethylene-hexamine (L6), towards solutions representative of the process, are assessed in the lab-scale. The solids were contacted with synthetic mono- and bi-ionic solutions containing Ni(II) and La(III) in a liquid/solid adsorption process. Contacting experiments were carried out at room temperature for 90 min by fixing a La concentration at 19 mM and varying the Ni one in the range of 19–100 mM. The four solids were able to capture Ni(II) and La(III), both in single- and bi-ionic solutions; however, the presence of the polyamine always results in a large improvement in the capture capability of the pristine sorbents. For all the four solids, capture behaviour is ascribable to an adsorption or ion-sorbent interaction process, because no formation of aquo- and hydroxy-Ni or La can be formed. The polyamine, able to capture Ni ions via coordination, allowed to differentiate ion capture behaviour, thus bypassing the direct competition between Ni and La ions for the capture sites found in the pristine solids. Release values in the 30–100% range were found upon one-step treatment with concentrated HNO3 solution. However, also, in this case, different metals recovery was found depending on both the sorbent and the ions, suggesting a possible selective recovery.

Capture and Release Mechanism of Ni and La Ions via Solid/Liquid Process: Use of Polymer-Modified Clay and Activated Carbons

Cinzia Cristiani;Giovanni Dotelli;Paola Gallo Stampino;Saverio Latorrata;
2022

Abstract

This study is a starting point for the development of an efficient method for rare earths (REs) and transition metals (TMs) recovery from waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) via a hydrometallurgical process. The capture and release capability of mineral clays (STx) and activated carbons (AC), pristine and modified (STx-L6 and AC-L6) with a linear penta-ethylene-hexamine (L6), towards solutions representative of the process, are assessed in the lab-scale. The solids were contacted with synthetic mono- and bi-ionic solutions containing Ni(II) and La(III) in a liquid/solid adsorption process. Contacting experiments were carried out at room temperature for 90 min by fixing a La concentration at 19 mM and varying the Ni one in the range of 19–100 mM. The four solids were able to capture Ni(II) and La(III), both in single- and bi-ionic solutions; however, the presence of the polyamine always results in a large improvement in the capture capability of the pristine sorbents. For all the four solids, capture behaviour is ascribable to an adsorption or ion-sorbent interaction process, because no formation of aquo- and hydroxy-Ni or La can be formed. The polyamine, able to capture Ni ions via coordination, allowed to differentiate ion capture behaviour, thus bypassing the direct competition between Ni and La ions for the capture sites found in the pristine solids. Release values in the 30–100% range were found upon one-step treatment with concentrated HNO3 solution. However, also, in this case, different metals recovery was found depending on both the sorbent and the ions, suggesting a possible selective recovery.
mixed solutions; polymer modified clay; polymer modified activated carbon; nickel ions; lanthanum ions; capture mechanism; release mechanism
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11311/1207323
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