Quantitative assessment of the complex hemodynamic environment in type B aortic dissection (TBAD) through computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations can provide detailed insights into the disease and its progression. As imaging and computational technologies have advanced, methodologies have been developed to increase the accuracy and physiological relevance of CFD simulations. This study presents a patient-specific workflow to simulate blood flow in TBAD, utilising the maximum amount of in vivo data available in the form of CT images, 4D-flow MRI and invasive Doppler-wire pressure measurements, to implement the recommended current best practice methodologies in terms of patient-specific geometry and boundary conditions. The study aimed to evaluate and verify this workflow through detailed qualitative and quantitative comparisons of the CFD and in vivo data. Based on data acquired from five TBAD patients, a range of essential model inputs was obtained, including inlet flow waveforms and 3-element Windkessel model parameters, which can be utilised in further studies where in vivo flow data is not available. Local and global analysis showed good consistency between CFD results and 4D-MRI data, with the maximum velocity in the primary entry tear differing by up to 0.3 m/s, and 80% of the analysed regions achieving moderate or strong correlations between the predicted and in vivo velocities. CFD predicted pressures were generally well matched to the Doppler-wire measurements, with some deviation in peak systolic values. Overall, this study presents a validated comprehensive workflow with extensive data for CFD simulation of TBAD.

Evaluation and verification of patient-specific modelling of type B aortic dissection

Saitta S.;Pirola S.;Dong Z.;
2022-01-01

Abstract

Quantitative assessment of the complex hemodynamic environment in type B aortic dissection (TBAD) through computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations can provide detailed insights into the disease and its progression. As imaging and computational technologies have advanced, methodologies have been developed to increase the accuracy and physiological relevance of CFD simulations. This study presents a patient-specific workflow to simulate blood flow in TBAD, utilising the maximum amount of in vivo data available in the form of CT images, 4D-flow MRI and invasive Doppler-wire pressure measurements, to implement the recommended current best practice methodologies in terms of patient-specific geometry and boundary conditions. The study aimed to evaluate and verify this workflow through detailed qualitative and quantitative comparisons of the CFD and in vivo data. Based on data acquired from five TBAD patients, a range of essential model inputs was obtained, including inlet flow waveforms and 3-element Windkessel model parameters, which can be utilised in further studies where in vivo flow data is not available. Local and global analysis showed good consistency between CFD results and 4D-MRI data, with the maximum velocity in the primary entry tear differing by up to 0.3 m/s, and 80% of the analysed regions achieving moderate or strong correlations between the predicted and in vivo velocities. CFD predicted pressures were generally well matched to the Doppler-wire measurements, with some deviation in peak systolic values. Overall, this study presents a validated comprehensive workflow with extensive data for CFD simulation of TBAD.
2022
4D-MRI
Computational fluid dynamics
Evaluation and verification
Patient-specific
Type B Aortic dissection
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11311/1203816
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