Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is used for the treatment of movement disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, dystonia, and essential tremor, and has shown clinical benefits in other brain disorders. A natural path for the improvement of this technique is to continuously observe the stimulation effects on patient symptoms and neurophysiological markers. This requires the evolution of conventional deep brain stimulators to bidirectional interfaces, able to record, process, store, and wirelessly communicate neural signals in a robust and reliable fashion. Here, we present the architecture, design, and first use of an implantable stimulation and sensing interface (AlphaDBSR System) characterized by artifact-free recording and distributed data management protocols. Its application in three patients with Parkinson’s disease (clinical trial n. NCT04681534) is shown as a proof of functioning of a clinically viable implanted brain-computer interface (BCI) for adaptive DBS. Reliable artifact free-recordings, and chronic long-term data and neural signal management are in place.

A New Implantable Closed-Loop Clinical Neural Interface: First Application in Parkinson’s Disease

Bonfanti, Andrea;Marceglia, Sara
2021-01-01

Abstract

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is used for the treatment of movement disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, dystonia, and essential tremor, and has shown clinical benefits in other brain disorders. A natural path for the improvement of this technique is to continuously observe the stimulation effects on patient symptoms and neurophysiological markers. This requires the evolution of conventional deep brain stimulators to bidirectional interfaces, able to record, process, store, and wirelessly communicate neural signals in a robust and reliable fashion. Here, we present the architecture, design, and first use of an implantable stimulation and sensing interface (AlphaDBSR System) characterized by artifact-free recording and distributed data management protocols. Its application in three patients with Parkinson’s disease (clinical trial n. NCT04681534) is shown as a proof of functioning of a clinically viable implanted brain-computer interface (BCI) for adaptive DBS. Reliable artifact free-recordings, and chronic long-term data and neural signal management are in place.
2021
deep brain stimulation, neuromodulation, closed-loop, local field potential (LFP), Parkinson’s disease, neural interface, implantable device
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11311/1192102
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