Eye-tracking technology allows to capture real-time visual behavior information and to provide insights about cognitive processes and autonomic function, by measuring gaze position and pupillary response to delivered stimuli. Over the recent years, the development of easy-to-use devices led to a large increase in the use of eye-tracking in a broad spectrum of applications, e.g. clinical diagnostics and psychological research. Given the lack of extensive material to characterize the performance of different eye-trackers, especially latest generation devices, the present study aimed at comparing a screen-mounted eye-tracker (remote) and a pair of wearable eye-tracking glasses (mobile). Seventeen healthy subjects were asked to look at a moving target on a screen for 90 s, while point of regard (POR) and pupil diameter (PD) were recorded by the two devices with a sampling rate of 30 Hz. First, data were preprocessed to remove artifacts, then correlation coefficients (for both signals) and magnitude-squared coherence (for PD) were calculated to assess signals agreement in time and frequency domain. POR measurements from remote and mobile devices resulted highly comparable (ρ > 0.75). PD showed lower correlation and major dispersion (ρ > 0.50), besides a higher number of invalid samples from the mobile device with respect to the remote one. Results provided evidence that the two instruments do share the same content at the level of information generally used to characterize subjects behavioral and physiological reactions. Future analysis of additional features and devices with higher sampling frequencies will be planned to further support their clinical use.

Characterization of Eye Gaze and Pupil Diameter Measurements from Remote and Mobile Eye-Tracking Devices

Lolatto R.;Rocco G.;Barbieri R.
2020-01-01

Abstract

Eye-tracking technology allows to capture real-time visual behavior information and to provide insights about cognitive processes and autonomic function, by measuring gaze position and pupillary response to delivered stimuli. Over the recent years, the development of easy-to-use devices led to a large increase in the use of eye-tracking in a broad spectrum of applications, e.g. clinical diagnostics and psychological research. Given the lack of extensive material to characterize the performance of different eye-trackers, especially latest generation devices, the present study aimed at comparing a screen-mounted eye-tracker (remote) and a pair of wearable eye-tracking glasses (mobile). Seventeen healthy subjects were asked to look at a moving target on a screen for 90 s, while point of regard (POR) and pupil diameter (PD) were recorded by the two devices with a sampling rate of 30 Hz. First, data were preprocessed to remove artifacts, then correlation coefficients (for both signals) and magnitude-squared coherence (for PD) were calculated to assess signals agreement in time and frequency domain. POR measurements from remote and mobile devices resulted highly comparable (ρ > 0.75). PD showed lower correlation and major dispersion (ρ > 0.50), besides a higher number of invalid samples from the mobile device with respect to the remote one. Results provided evidence that the two instruments do share the same content at the level of information generally used to characterize subjects behavioral and physiological reactions. Future analysis of additional features and devices with higher sampling frequencies will be planned to further support their clinical use.
IFMBE Proceedings
14339277 16800737
Eye gaze
Eye tracking
Mobile eye-tracker
Pupil diameter
Remote eye-tracker
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11311/1170298
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