Current COVID-19 pandemic caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has put a spotlight on the spread of infectious diseases brought on by pathogenic airborne bacteria and viruses. In parallel with a relentless search for therapeutics and vaccines, considerable effort is being expended to develop ever more powerful technologies to restricting the spread of airborne microorganisms in indoor spaces through the minimization of health- and environment-related risks. In this context, UV-based and photocatalytic oxidation (PCO)-based technologies (i.e., the combined action of ultraviolet (UV) light and photocatalytic materials such as titanium dioxide (TiO2)) represent the most widely utilized approaches at present because they are cost-effective and ecofriendly. The virucidal and bactericidal effect relies on the synergy between the inherent ability of UV light to directly inactivate viral particles and bacteria through nucleic acid and protein damages, and the production of oxidative radicals generated through the irradiation of the TiO2 surface. In this literature survey, we draw attention to the most effective UV radiations and TiO2-based PCO technologies available and their underlying mechanisms of action on both bacteria and viral particles. Since the fine tuning of different parameters, namely the UV wavelength, the photocatalyst composition, and the UV dose (viz, the product of UV light intensity and the irradiation time), is required for the inactivation of microorganisms, we wrap up this review coming up with the most effective combination of them. Now more than ever, UV- and TiO2-based disinfection technologies may represent a valuable tool to mitigate the spread of airborne pathogens.

Effect of UV Irradiation and TiO2-Photocatalysis on Airborne Bacteria and Viruses: An Overview

Bono, Nina;Ponti, Federica;Punta, Carlo;Candiani, Gabriele
2021

Abstract

Current COVID-19 pandemic caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has put a spotlight on the spread of infectious diseases brought on by pathogenic airborne bacteria and viruses. In parallel with a relentless search for therapeutics and vaccines, considerable effort is being expended to develop ever more powerful technologies to restricting the spread of airborne microorganisms in indoor spaces through the minimization of health- and environment-related risks. In this context, UV-based and photocatalytic oxidation (PCO)-based technologies (i.e., the combined action of ultraviolet (UV) light and photocatalytic materials such as titanium dioxide (TiO2)) represent the most widely utilized approaches at present because they are cost-effective and ecofriendly. The virucidal and bactericidal effect relies on the synergy between the inherent ability of UV light to directly inactivate viral particles and bacteria through nucleic acid and protein damages, and the production of oxidative radicals generated through the irradiation of the TiO2 surface. In this literature survey, we draw attention to the most effective UV radiations and TiO2-based PCO technologies available and their underlying mechanisms of action on both bacteria and viral particles. Since the fine tuning of different parameters, namely the UV wavelength, the photocatalyst composition, and the UV dose (viz, the product of UV light intensity and the irradiation time), is required for the inactivation of microorganisms, we wrap up this review coming up with the most effective combination of them. Now more than ever, UV- and TiO2-based disinfection technologies may represent a valuable tool to mitigate the spread of airborne pathogens.
MATERIALS
UV light
antibacterial
antiviral
disinfection
photocatalysis
titanium dioxide
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11311/1166478
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