Arua, due to its strategic geographical position, is a rapidly growing urban centre in Ugandan West Nile region and an important base for humanitarian operations. Refugees from South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) currently form 23% of the regional population, with around 700.000 registered refugees (UNHCR, 2018) and unregistered migrants contributing to the figures The Ugandan Government plans to upgrade Arua to a “regional city”, to include the enlargement of its boundaries and the enhancement of air and rail infrastructure among others, envisioning it as a potential logistic node for North-Western Uganda. However, no strategic framework is provided at regional, city or neighbourhood scales to promote a synergic development with neighbouring towns (Koboko and Nebbi), districts and countries (DRC and South Sudan). Although rapid urbanization is already threatening existing socio-ecological assets and increasing conflict potential related to land rights and access to basic infrastructure and services, there is a lack of appropriate assessment and strategic tools to address the complex transformation of these territories. Moving from the results of previous capacity development initiatives in the framework of the Ugandan Support for Municipal Infrastructure Development (USMID) program, a project for a comprehensive profiling of the region across different planning scales has been initiated by UNHabitat in August 2018 with the financial support from the Booyoung Foundation, with the aim of supporting a better understanding of the West Nile Region as a metropolitan system along the Nebbi-AruaKoboko development corridor. Among other priorities, exploring how decision making at territorial scale would also influence city and neighbourhood level was in the focus of the regional profile. Politecnico di Milano has been selected as the implementing partner with UN-Habitat to draft a multidisciplinary analysis of the existing situation at regional and territorial scale, including development of specific metropolitan cartography, while UN-Habitat’s Public Space and Urban Economy teams have conducted in-dept research on urban economy and municipal finance, as well as a public space assessment and recommendations at neighbourhood scale in each municipality. This report outlines the results of the research activity, including desktop research and field studies, complemented by a factfinding mission and workshops held in the West Nile Region in October and November 2018 for the effective interaction with local experts and stakeholders, at both national and local level. The following chapters synthesize main findings with the aim of providing a set of recommendations.

West Nile Region, Uganda - Integrated and Multi Scalar Planning (Koboko, Arua, Nebbi)

Contin, A.;Frigerio, A.;Musetta, A.;
2019

Abstract

Arua, due to its strategic geographical position, is a rapidly growing urban centre in Ugandan West Nile region and an important base for humanitarian operations. Refugees from South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) currently form 23% of the regional population, with around 700.000 registered refugees (UNHCR, 2018) and unregistered migrants contributing to the figures The Ugandan Government plans to upgrade Arua to a “regional city”, to include the enlargement of its boundaries and the enhancement of air and rail infrastructure among others, envisioning it as a potential logistic node for North-Western Uganda. However, no strategic framework is provided at regional, city or neighbourhood scales to promote a synergic development with neighbouring towns (Koboko and Nebbi), districts and countries (DRC and South Sudan). Although rapid urbanization is already threatening existing socio-ecological assets and increasing conflict potential related to land rights and access to basic infrastructure and services, there is a lack of appropriate assessment and strategic tools to address the complex transformation of these territories. Moving from the results of previous capacity development initiatives in the framework of the Ugandan Support for Municipal Infrastructure Development (USMID) program, a project for a comprehensive profiling of the region across different planning scales has been initiated by UNHabitat in August 2018 with the financial support from the Booyoung Foundation, with the aim of supporting a better understanding of the West Nile Region as a metropolitan system along the Nebbi-AruaKoboko development corridor. Among other priorities, exploring how decision making at territorial scale would also influence city and neighbourhood level was in the focus of the regional profile. Politecnico di Milano has been selected as the implementing partner with UN-Habitat to draft a multidisciplinary analysis of the existing situation at regional and territorial scale, including development of specific metropolitan cartography, while UN-Habitat’s Public Space and Urban Economy teams have conducted in-dept research on urban economy and municipal finance, as well as a public space assessment and recommendations at neighbourhood scale in each municipality. This report outlines the results of the research activity, including desktop research and field studies, complemented by a factfinding mission and workshops held in the West Nile Region in October and November 2018 for the effective interaction with local experts and stakeholders, at both national and local level. The following chapters synthesize main findings with the aim of providing a set of recommendations.
Multi Scalar Planning, Uganda, Metropolitan Region
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
integrated_and_multi-scalar_planning_in_west_nile_region_uganda_small.pdf

accesso aperto

: Publisher’s version
Dimensione 9.33 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
9.33 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11311/1159914
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact