Aims: A plethora of mobile health applications (m-health apps) to support healthcare are available for both patients and healthcare professionals (HCPs) but content and quality vary considerably and few have undergone formal assessment. The aim is to systematically review the literature on m-health apps for managing atrial fibrillation (AF) that examine the impact on knowledge of AF, patient and HCP behaviour, patients' quality-of-life, and user engagement. Methods and results: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsychInfo were searched from 1 January 2005 to 5 September 2019, with hand-searching of clinical trial registers and grey literature. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they reported changes in any of the following: (i) knowledge of AF; (ii) provider behaviour (e.g. guideline adherence); (iii) patient behaviour (e.g. medication adherence); (iv) patient quality-of-life; and (v) user engagement. Two reviewers independently assessed articles for eligibility. A narrative review was undertaken as included studies varied widely in their design, interventions, comparators, and outcomes. Seven studies were included; six m-health apps aimed at patients and one at HCPs. Mobile health apps ranged widely in design, features, and method of delivery. Four studies reported patient knowledge of AF; three demonstrated significant knowledge improvement post-intervention or compared to usual care. One study reported greater HCP adherence to oral anticoagulation guidelines after m-health app implementation. Two studies reported on patient medication adherence and quality-of-life; both showed improved quality-of-life post-intervention but only one observed increased adherence. Regarding user engagement, five studies reported patient perspectives on usability, three on acceptability, and one on feasibility; overall all m-health apps were rated positively. Conclusion: Mobile health apps demonstrate improvements in patient knowledge, behaviour, and quality of life. Studies formally evaluating the impact of m-health on HCP behaviour are scarce and larger-scale studies with representative patient cohorts, appropriate comparators, and longer-Term assessment of the impact of m-health apps are warranted.

Mobile health applications for managing atrial fibrillation for healthcare professionals and patients: A systematic review

Caiani E. G.;
2020-01-01

Abstract

Aims: A plethora of mobile health applications (m-health apps) to support healthcare are available for both patients and healthcare professionals (HCPs) but content and quality vary considerably and few have undergone formal assessment. The aim is to systematically review the literature on m-health apps for managing atrial fibrillation (AF) that examine the impact on knowledge of AF, patient and HCP behaviour, patients' quality-of-life, and user engagement. Methods and results: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsychInfo were searched from 1 January 2005 to 5 September 2019, with hand-searching of clinical trial registers and grey literature. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they reported changes in any of the following: (i) knowledge of AF; (ii) provider behaviour (e.g. guideline adherence); (iii) patient behaviour (e.g. medication adherence); (iv) patient quality-of-life; and (v) user engagement. Two reviewers independently assessed articles for eligibility. A narrative review was undertaken as included studies varied widely in their design, interventions, comparators, and outcomes. Seven studies were included; six m-health apps aimed at patients and one at HCPs. Mobile health apps ranged widely in design, features, and method of delivery. Four studies reported patient knowledge of AF; three demonstrated significant knowledge improvement post-intervention or compared to usual care. One study reported greater HCP adherence to oral anticoagulation guidelines after m-health app implementation. Two studies reported on patient medication adherence and quality-of-life; both showed improved quality-of-life post-intervention but only one observed increased adherence. Regarding user engagement, five studies reported patient perspectives on usability, three on acceptability, and one on feasibility; overall all m-health apps were rated positively. Conclusion: Mobile health apps demonstrate improvements in patient knowledge, behaviour, and quality of life. Studies formally evaluating the impact of m-health on HCP behaviour are scarce and larger-scale studies with representative patient cohorts, appropriate comparators, and longer-Term assessment of the impact of m-health apps are warranted.
2020
Apps
Atrial fibrillation
Healthcare professionals
Management
Mobile health
Patients
Systematic review
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11311/1158705
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