The innovation demand placed on both profit-driven and missiondriven organisations is steadily rising in the face of changing technological and social paradigms, set against a generalised atmosphere of fiscal austerity. Hence, mission-driven organisations have undergone a series of transformations in order to find new revenue streams and to better serve their beneficiaries. These transformations are apparent in the area of social innovation, which is characterized by its search for new ways of financing solutions to cope with societal challenges. As mission-driven organisations adopt profit-driven strategies and for-profit organisations adopt missiondriven strategies, they each take on new and sometimes borrowed characteristics, evolving into hybrid organisations. Social innovation research is increasingly devoted to distinguishing features of mission-driven and profit-driven organisations. In fact, we can learn more about mission-driven organisations by looking through the lens of social enterprise. This article contributes to the ongoing debate of mission-driven organisations by analysing how new forms of business models combining mission-driven and profit-driven logics and features are designed and shape organisational behaviour in the field of social innovation. Results illustrate that while mission-driven organisations are often prompted to use models, tools and logics coming from the for-profit sector, more emphasise should be placed on output-oriented models and tools that support the specificities of their business models.

Business Models & Social innovation: Mission-driven versus Profit-driven Organisations

Deserti A.;Rizzo F.;
2020

Abstract

The innovation demand placed on both profit-driven and missiondriven organisations is steadily rising in the face of changing technological and social paradigms, set against a generalised atmosphere of fiscal austerity. Hence, mission-driven organisations have undergone a series of transformations in order to find new revenue streams and to better serve their beneficiaries. These transformations are apparent in the area of social innovation, which is characterized by its search for new ways of financing solutions to cope with societal challenges. As mission-driven organisations adopt profit-driven strategies and for-profit organisations adopt missiondriven strategies, they each take on new and sometimes borrowed characteristics, evolving into hybrid organisations. Social innovation research is increasingly devoted to distinguishing features of mission-driven and profit-driven organisations. In fact, we can learn more about mission-driven organisations by looking through the lens of social enterprise. This article contributes to the ongoing debate of mission-driven organisations by analysing how new forms of business models combining mission-driven and profit-driven logics and features are designed and shape organisational behaviour in the field of social innovation. Results illustrate that while mission-driven organisations are often prompted to use models, tools and logics coming from the for-profit sector, more emphasise should be placed on output-oriented models and tools that support the specificities of their business models.
Social innovation; business models; mission-driven organisations; profit-driven organisations; actor constellations; case studies
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
2018-07-13_BusinessModels_final.docx

accesso aperto

: Pre-Print (o Pre-Refereeing)
Dimensione 63.88 kB
Formato Microsoft Word XML
63.88 kB Microsoft Word XML Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11311/1141923
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 8
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 6
social impact