Evapotranspiration (ET) is considered a key variable in the understanding of the Amazonian tropical forests and their response to climate change. Remote-Sensing (RS) based evapotranspiration models are presented as a feasible means in order to provide accurate spatially-distributed ET estimates over this region. In this work, the performance of four commonly used ET RS models was evaluated over Amazonia using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data. RS models included i) Priestley-Taylor Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PT-JPL), ii) Penman-Monteith MODIS operative parametrization (PM-Mu), iii) Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS), and iv) Satellite Application Facility on Land Surface Analysis (LSASAF). These models were forced using two ancillary meteorological data sources: i) in-situ data extracted from Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment (LBA) stations (scenario I), and ii) three reanalysis datasets (scenario II), including Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Application (MERRA-2), European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Re-Analysis-Interim (ERA-Interim), and Global Land Assimilation System (GLDAS-2). Performance of algorithms under the two scenarios was validated using in-situ eddy-covariance measurements. For scenario I, PT-JPL provided the best agreement with in-situ ET observations (RMSE = 0.55 mm/day, R = 0.88). Neglecting water canopy evaporation resulted in an underestimation of ET measurements for LSASAF. SEBS performance was similar to that of PT-JPL, nevertheless SEBS estimates were limited by the continuous cloud cover of the region. A physically-based ET gap-filling method was used in order to alleviate this issue. PM-Mu tended to overestimate in-situ ET observations. For scenario II, quality assessment of reanalysis input data demonstrated that MERRA-2, ERA-Interim and GLDAS-2 contain biases that impact model performance. In particular, biases in radiation inputs were found the main responsible of the observed biases in ET estimates. For the region, MERRA-2 tends to overestimate daily net radiation and incoming solar radiation. ERA-Interim tends to underestimate both variables, and GLDAS tends to overestimate daily radiation while underestimating incoming solar radiation. Discrepancies amongst these reanalysis inputs generally explain the observed discrepancies in model spatial and temporal patterns.

Intercomparison of remote-sensing based evapotranspiration algorithms over amazonian forests

Corbari, Chiara;Mancini, Marco
2019

Abstract

Evapotranspiration (ET) is considered a key variable in the understanding of the Amazonian tropical forests and their response to climate change. Remote-Sensing (RS) based evapotranspiration models are presented as a feasible means in order to provide accurate spatially-distributed ET estimates over this region. In this work, the performance of four commonly used ET RS models was evaluated over Amazonia using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data. RS models included i) Priestley-Taylor Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PT-JPL), ii) Penman-Monteith MODIS operative parametrization (PM-Mu), iii) Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS), and iv) Satellite Application Facility on Land Surface Analysis (LSASAF). These models were forced using two ancillary meteorological data sources: i) in-situ data extracted from Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment (LBA) stations (scenario I), and ii) three reanalysis datasets (scenario II), including Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Application (MERRA-2), European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Re-Analysis-Interim (ERA-Interim), and Global Land Assimilation System (GLDAS-2). Performance of algorithms under the two scenarios was validated using in-situ eddy-covariance measurements. For scenario I, PT-JPL provided the best agreement with in-situ ET observations (RMSE = 0.55 mm/day, R = 0.88). Neglecting water canopy evaporation resulted in an underestimation of ET measurements for LSASAF. SEBS performance was similar to that of PT-JPL, nevertheless SEBS estimates were limited by the continuous cloud cover of the region. A physically-based ET gap-filling method was used in order to alleviate this issue. PM-Mu tended to overestimate in-situ ET observations. For scenario II, quality assessment of reanalysis input data demonstrated that MERRA-2, ERA-Interim and GLDAS-2 contain biases that impact model performance. In particular, biases in radiation inputs were found the main responsible of the observed biases in ET estimates. For the region, MERRA-2 tends to overestimate daily net radiation and incoming solar radiation. ERA-Interim tends to underestimate both variables, and GLDAS tends to overestimate daily radiation while underestimating incoming solar radiation. Discrepancies amongst these reanalysis inputs generally explain the observed discrepancies in model spatial and temporal patterns.
Amazonian tropical forests; Terrestrial evapotranspiration; MODIS; Reanalysis
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11311/1130379
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