According to the literature approximately 40% of global energy in 2007 has been using in the buildings which is responsible for 30% of total carbon emission. This human induced carbon emissions cause climate change by increasing global temperature. In this sense, energy consumption in the life cycle of buildings results in two different components: embodied carbon and operational carbon. Embodied carbon, encompasses extraction and processing of raw materials; manufacturing, transportation and distribution; use, reuse, maintenance, recycling and disposal. Operational energy is consumed in operating the buildings, e.g. heating and cooling systems, lighting, and home appliances which accomplish some household functions. A number of measures and targets have been introduced, including various fiscal and regulatory instruments to handle climate change and move towards low and zero carbon buildings. Overall, the increase in efficiency of energy use is as vital as production of energy and results in direct or indirect energy savings, and subsequently mitigates high energy cost. The aim of this paper is to highlight the impact of "different strategies" on embodied energy and ultimately on the environment. This concern provides a more integrative approach to calculate a building's embodied carbon in the housing life cycle assessment considering the following strategies: (1) Choice of construction materials such as wood and glass etc... When designing buildings, (2) Minimizing distance between building and raw material supply, (3) Choosing recyclability in building materials and parts, (4) Minimization of building-related waste during the construction processes, and (5) Planning in accordance with recent efforts for standardization of embodied carbon in the buildings. material supply, (3) Choosing recyclability in building materials and parts, (4) Minimization of building-related waste during the construction processes, and (5) Planning in accordance with recent efforts for standardization of embodied carbon in the buildings.Copyright

Impact of embodied carbon in the life cycle of buildings on climate change for a sustainable future

Celani, A.;Ciaramella, A.
2016

Abstract

According to the literature approximately 40% of global energy in 2007 has been using in the buildings which is responsible for 30% of total carbon emission. This human induced carbon emissions cause climate change by increasing global temperature. In this sense, energy consumption in the life cycle of buildings results in two different components: embodied carbon and operational carbon. Embodied carbon, encompasses extraction and processing of raw materials; manufacturing, transportation and distribution; use, reuse, maintenance, recycling and disposal. Operational energy is consumed in operating the buildings, e.g. heating and cooling systems, lighting, and home appliances which accomplish some household functions. A number of measures and targets have been introduced, including various fiscal and regulatory instruments to handle climate change and move towards low and zero carbon buildings. Overall, the increase in efficiency of energy use is as vital as production of energy and results in direct or indirect energy savings, and subsequently mitigates high energy cost. The aim of this paper is to highlight the impact of "different strategies" on embodied energy and ultimately on the environment. This concern provides a more integrative approach to calculate a building's embodied carbon in the housing life cycle assessment considering the following strategies: (1) Choice of construction materials such as wood and glass etc... When designing buildings, (2) Minimizing distance between building and raw material supply, (3) Choosing recyclability in building materials and parts, (4) Minimization of building-related waste during the construction processes, and (5) Planning in accordance with recent efforts for standardization of embodied carbon in the buildings. material supply, (3) Choosing recyclability in building materials and parts, (4) Minimization of building-related waste during the construction processes, and (5) Planning in accordance with recent efforts for standardization of embodied carbon in the buildings.Copyright
Buildings; Embodied energy; Housing; Life cycle; Sustainability; Architecture2300 Environmental Science (all); Building and Construction; Mechanical Engineering; Marketing
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11311/1056447
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