State-of-the-art facilities for measuring human-induced dynamic forces comprise typically equipment for direct force measurement, made of a single or several force plates and an instrumented treadmill mounted on a rigid laboratory floor. Artificial laboratory conditions and constraints imposed by the direct measurement systems, such as small measuring area of a force plate and constant speed of rotation of a treadmill belt, can exert a strong influence on human ability to move naturally, and hence may alter corresponding ground reaction forces. However, when dealing with issues like vibration serviceability of real full-scale structures such as grandstands, floors and footbridges, there is a growing need to estimate loads applied directly by occupants under a wider range of conditions in outdoor environments. This paper thus presents a novel method to utilise 'free field' measurement of human-induced excitation continuously in time using motion capturing technology. Such data are crucial for establishing a new generation of mathematical models of dynamic forces generated by individuals and groups of people when bouncing, jumping, walking, etc. © 2009 Society for Experimental Mechanics Inc.

Novel experimental characterisation of human-induced loading

Racic, Vitomir;
2009-01-01

Abstract

State-of-the-art facilities for measuring human-induced dynamic forces comprise typically equipment for direct force measurement, made of a single or several force plates and an instrumented treadmill mounted on a rigid laboratory floor. Artificial laboratory conditions and constraints imposed by the direct measurement systems, such as small measuring area of a force plate and constant speed of rotation of a treadmill belt, can exert a strong influence on human ability to move naturally, and hence may alter corresponding ground reaction forces. However, when dealing with issues like vibration serviceability of real full-scale structures such as grandstands, floors and footbridges, there is a growing need to estimate loads applied directly by occupants under a wider range of conditions in outdoor environments. This paper thus presents a novel method to utilise 'free field' measurement of human-induced excitation continuously in time using motion capturing technology. Such data are crucial for establishing a new generation of mathematical models of dynamic forces generated by individuals and groups of people when bouncing, jumping, walking, etc. © 2009 Society for Experimental Mechanics Inc.
Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series
9781605609614
Engineering (all); Computational Mechanics; Mechanical Engineering
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Racic (2009) IMAC.pdf

Accesso riservato

: Publisher’s version
Dimensione 291.52 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
291.52 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11311/1056172
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 1
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact