In obesity, the increased O2cost of breathing negatively affects the O2cost of exercise and exercise tolerance. The purpose of the study was to determine whether, in obese adolescents, the addition of respiratory muscle endurance training (RMET) (isocapnic hyperpnea) to a standard body mass reduction program decreases the O2cost of exercise and perceived exertion. Nine male obese adolescents [16.0 ± 1.4 yr (x± SD), body mass 114.4 ± 22.3 kg] underwent 3 wk of RMET (5 days/week) in addition to a standard body mass reduction program. Eight age- and sex-matched obese adolescents underwent only the standard program (CTRL). Before and after interventions, patients performed on a cycle ergometer: incremental exercise; 12-min exercises at a constant work rate (CWR) of 65% and 120% at the gas exchange threshold (GET) determined before the intervention. Breath-by-breath pulmonary ventilation (V̇e) and O2uptake (V̇o2), heart rate (HR), and ratings of perceived exertion for dyspnea/respiratory discomfort (RPER) and leg effort (RPEL) were determined. Body mass decreased (by ~3.0 kg) after both RMET (P= 0.003) and CTRL (P= 0.002). Peak V̇o2was not affected by both interventions. Peak work rate was slightly, but significantly (P= 0.04), greater after RMET but not after CTRL. During CWR < GET, no changes were observed after both interventions. During CWR > GET, the O2cost of cycling at the end of exercise (P= 0.02), the slope of V̇o2vs. time (3-12 min) (P= 0.01), RPER(P= 0.01), and RPEL(P= 0.01) decreased following RMET, but not following CTRL. HR decreased after both RMET (P= 0.02) and CTRL (P= 0.03), whereas V̇e did not change. In obese adolescents RMET, superimposed on a standard body mass reduction program, lowered the O2cost of cycling and perceived exertion during constant heavy-intensity exercise.

Respiratory muscle endurance training reduces the O2 cost of cycling and perceived exertion in obese adolescents

Lo Mauro, Antonella;Aliverti, Andrea;
2017

Abstract

In obesity, the increased O2cost of breathing negatively affects the O2cost of exercise and exercise tolerance. The purpose of the study was to determine whether, in obese adolescents, the addition of respiratory muscle endurance training (RMET) (isocapnic hyperpnea) to a standard body mass reduction program decreases the O2cost of exercise and perceived exertion. Nine male obese adolescents [16.0 ± 1.4 yr (x± SD), body mass 114.4 ± 22.3 kg] underwent 3 wk of RMET (5 days/week) in addition to a standard body mass reduction program. Eight age- and sex-matched obese adolescents underwent only the standard program (CTRL). Before and after interventions, patients performed on a cycle ergometer: incremental exercise; 12-min exercises at a constant work rate (CWR) of 65% and 120% at the gas exchange threshold (GET) determined before the intervention. Breath-by-breath pulmonary ventilation (V̇e) and O2uptake (V̇o2), heart rate (HR), and ratings of perceived exertion for dyspnea/respiratory discomfort (RPER) and leg effort (RPEL) were determined. Body mass decreased (by ~3.0 kg) after both RMET (P= 0.003) and CTRL (P= 0.002). Peak V̇o2was not affected by both interventions. Peak work rate was slightly, but significantly (P= 0.04), greater after RMET but not after CTRL. During CWR < GET, no changes were observed after both interventions. During CWR > GET, the O2cost of cycling at the end of exercise (P= 0.02), the slope of V̇o2vs. time (3-12 min) (P= 0.01), RPER(P= 0.01), and RPEL(P= 0.01) decreased following RMET, but not following CTRL. HR decreased after both RMET (P= 0.02) and CTRL (P= 0.03), whereas V̇e did not change. In obese adolescents RMET, superimposed on a standard body mass reduction program, lowered the O2cost of cycling and perceived exertion during constant heavy-intensity exercise.
AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHYSIOLOGY. REGULATORY, INTEGRATIVE AND COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY
O2 cost of breathing; O2 cost of cycling; obesity; perceived exertion; respiratory muscle endurance training; Adolescent; Bicycling; Exercise; Exercise Test; Exercise Therapy; Exercise Tolerance; Humans; Male; Obesity; Oxygen Consumption; Physical Endurance; Physical Exertion; Respiratory Muscles; Weight Reduction Programs; Young Adult
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11311/1045366
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