In recent times, the influence of human behaviour on Earth's atmosphere is so significant to suggest the identification of the beginning of a distinct new geological Epoch, named with the term Anthropocene. It would be the last Epoch of the current Quaternary Period (starting 2.58 million years ago), following the current Holocene Epoch (starting 11.700 years ago). Anthropocene could also be read as a cultural concept, related to philosophy, literature and arts; a concept with which Humanities deal with complex questions about the relation between human beings, artefacts, nature and time. As a consequence, this relationship becomes relevant concerning the existing built environment. In fact, Contemporary Ruins (hereby meant as the dismissed, incomplete, and abandoned heritage built less than a century ago) are increasingly recognized as a growing phenomenon, both in terms of increasing numbers of reported case studies, and their rising territorial extensions. Moreover, in the past decades, dismissed buildings where easily reabsorbed through a process of re-functionalization, conversion of use, or physiologically assimilated by nature. Nowadays, these phenomena become visible. These tangible evidences of traumatic events, failures, and transformations, often remain as evident presences, because they are made up of new materials, built in contexts that don’t have the ability to re-metabolize them or because of their huge and growing territorial dimensions. Historically, Design represented the creative engine that generated tools, products, spaces, etc. It was an activity carried on only by few and skilled experts. Today, it seems assuming another direction, a more spread and expanded character. The so-called ‘diffuse design’ refers to design activities undertaken by a growing number of individuals. These actions often lead to large transformations, bringing about big social changes. Apparently, design could be seen as a shared attitude. This attitude is so widespread, expanded and shared that becomes part of the aforementioned cultural model that deals with the fundamental relationships between human beings, nature and time. Accordingly with the three topics outlined, we propose an exploratory paper with the aim to investigate the role of design attitude in the process of intervention on new fragile and complex territorial scenarios due to the growing dimensions of Contemporary Ruins. A critical reflection, supported by the cultural framework of Antropocene’s concept, in which natural elements and results of human activity become elements of the same scenario, complex as homogeneous, on which design actions can be activated, with the involvement of a new designing society.

Anthropocene and Design. The role of design in the emerging territorial scenarios of concemporary ruins in the Anthropocene epoch

GRAMEGNA, SILVIA MARIA;CAMOCINI, BARBARA;PIARDI, SILVIA ELVIRA MARIA;BIAMONTI, ALESSANDRO
2017

Abstract

In recent times, the influence of human behaviour on Earth's atmosphere is so significant to suggest the identification of the beginning of a distinct new geological Epoch, named with the term Anthropocene. It would be the last Epoch of the current Quaternary Period (starting 2.58 million years ago), following the current Holocene Epoch (starting 11.700 years ago). Anthropocene could also be read as a cultural concept, related to philosophy, literature and arts; a concept with which Humanities deal with complex questions about the relation between human beings, artefacts, nature and time. As a consequence, this relationship becomes relevant concerning the existing built environment. In fact, Contemporary Ruins (hereby meant as the dismissed, incomplete, and abandoned heritage built less than a century ago) are increasingly recognized as a growing phenomenon, both in terms of increasing numbers of reported case studies, and their rising territorial extensions. Moreover, in the past decades, dismissed buildings where easily reabsorbed through a process of re-functionalization, conversion of use, or physiologically assimilated by nature. Nowadays, these phenomena become visible. These tangible evidences of traumatic events, failures, and transformations, often remain as evident presences, because they are made up of new materials, built in contexts that don’t have the ability to re-metabolize them or because of their huge and growing territorial dimensions. Historically, Design represented the creative engine that generated tools, products, spaces, etc. It was an activity carried on only by few and skilled experts. Today, it seems assuming another direction, a more spread and expanded character. The so-called ‘diffuse design’ refers to design activities undertaken by a growing number of individuals. These actions often lead to large transformations, bringing about big social changes. Apparently, design could be seen as a shared attitude. This attitude is so widespread, expanded and shared that becomes part of the aforementioned cultural model that deals with the fundamental relationships between human beings, nature and time. Accordingly with the three topics outlined, we propose an exploratory paper with the aim to investigate the role of design attitude in the process of intervention on new fragile and complex territorial scenarios due to the growing dimensions of Contemporary Ruins. A critical reflection, supported by the cultural framework of Antropocene’s concept, in which natural elements and results of human activity become elements of the same scenario, complex as homogeneous, on which design actions can be activated, with the involvement of a new designing society.
4D-Designing Development / Developing Design. Conference Proceedings
978-609-02-1364-3
Design, Anthropocene, Evolution, Contemporary Ruins, Spatial Design
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11311/1032795
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