Light sheet fluorescence microscopy has proven to be a powerful tool to image fixed and chemically cleared samples, providing in depth and high resolution reconstructions of intact mouse organs. We applied light sheet microscopy to image the mouse intestine. We found that large portions of the sample can be readily visualized, assessing the organ status and highlighting the presence of regions with impaired morphology. Yet, three-dimensional (3-D) sectioning of the intestine leads to a large dataset that produces unnecessary storage and processing overload. We developed a routine that extracts the relevant information from a large image stack and provides quantitative analysis of the intestine morphology. This result was achieved by a three step procedure consisting of: (1) virtually unfold the 3-D reconstruction of the intestine; (2) observe it layer-by-layer; and (3) identify distinct villi and statistically analyze multiple samples belonging to different intestinal regions. Even if the procedure has been developed for the murine intestine, most of the underlying concepts have a general applicability.

Virtual unfolding of light sheet fluorescence microscopy dataset for quantitative analysis of the mouse intestine

CANDEO, ALESSIA;D'ANDREA, COSIMO;VALENTINI, GIANLUCA;BASSI, ANDREA
2016-01-01

Abstract

Light sheet fluorescence microscopy has proven to be a powerful tool to image fixed and chemically cleared samples, providing in depth and high resolution reconstructions of intact mouse organs. We applied light sheet microscopy to image the mouse intestine. We found that large portions of the sample can be readily visualized, assessing the organ status and highlighting the presence of regions with impaired morphology. Yet, three-dimensional (3-D) sectioning of the intestine leads to a large dataset that produces unnecessary storage and processing overload. We developed a routine that extracts the relevant information from a large image stack and provides quantitative analysis of the intestine morphology. This result was achieved by a three step procedure consisting of: (1) virtually unfold the 3-D reconstruction of the intestine; (2) observe it layer-by-layer; and (3) identify distinct villi and statistically analyze multiple samples belonging to different intestinal regions. Even if the procedure has been developed for the murine intestine, most of the underlying concepts have a general applicability.
2016
image processing; light sheet fluorescence microscopy; Three-dimensional microscopy; Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials; Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics; Biomaterials; Biomedical Engineering
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11311/1013557
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